About

Clean Energy Now is a collaboration of groups in Michigan working to keep new, dirty and expensive coal plants out of MI and move our state towards a clean energy future.

Mission

It’s time for Michigan’s utilities to move into the 21st Century and away from coal.

Each year, Michigan sends over $1.36 billion out of state to import coal for unneeded and uneconomic coal-fired power plants.  Our money goes out of state, and we’re left with the enormous threats to Michigan’s health and environment by relying on coal-fired power plants. Michigan can’t afford the enormous health and environmental threats, we can’t afford the skyrocketing costs, and we can’t afford to harness ourselves to dirty coal.

Jobs for clean and renewable energy are rare bright spot in Michigan’s economy. Between 2005 and 2008, Michigan’s Green Jobs sector was the only part of our economy that actually grew. C

Our state can create hundreds of sustainable, family wage jobs by investing in energy saving measures as well as renewable resources. Renewable sources of energy are less expensive, cleaner, and present more  ways to meet our energy needs while investing our resources for good local jobs in Michigan.

It’s time to transition to a clean energy economy in Michigan that ensures prosperity, good jobs and healthy families in the future. Communities and workers are looking for a plan to move beyond coal and climate disruption. It’s time for Michigan’s utilities to transition to renewable energy sources and increase energy efficiency, good investments for both ratepayers and shareholders.

Standing in the Way of Michigan’s Clean Energy Future-

2 Proposed new coal-fired power plants

  • Holland Board of Public Works is proposing an 70MW expansion of its James De Young plant that is estimated to cost ratepayers more than $330 million
  • Wolverine Power Cooperative is proposing a 600 MW coal-fired plant for Rogers City.  The Michigan Public Service Commission estimated that unneeded and polluting plant is expected to raise rates for co-op member ratepayers by an average of $77/month.

Existing, old coal-fired power plants

Michigan has 25 old, existing coal-fired power plants, most of which lack modern pollution controls.  This includes plants owned by Consumers Energy, DTE Energy, Lansing Board of Power and Light, Holland Board of Public Works, We Energies and Michigan State University.   All of these plants emit air toxic pollutants like mercury, soot and smog that are linked to asthma attacks, lung disease, and neurological disorders. In Michigan alone, over 225,000 children suffer from asthma, according to a 2010 American Lung Associate estimate.  Pollution from coal-fired power plants causes over 13,000 premature deaths, 200,000 asthma attacks, and more than $100 billion in health care costs each year.

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  1. [...] in renewables to reduce the state’s dependence on coal imported from out-of-state. This, according to their plan, would save the environment, jobs, and dollars for ratepayers, because, while Michigan has spent [...]

  2. [...] in renewables to reduce the state’s dependence on coal imported from out-of-state. This, according to their plan, would save the environment, jobs, and dollars for ratepayers, because, while Michigan has spent [...]

  3. [...] in renewables to reduce the state’s dependence on coal imported from out-of-state. This, according to their plan, would save the environment, jobs, and dollars for ratepayers, because, while Michigan has spent [...]

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